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Alina, Kharkiv/China

“ I wake up every morning and say to myself: "There is a war going on in Ukraine, I no longer have a home." The world has gone crazy. ”
I have been living in China for many years, but my small family (mom, stepfather and aunt) has always lived in Ukraine, in my native Kharkiv. I had a lot of resentment against my country, which is probably why I left.When the war began, it was already day in China. I read the news and immediately called my mom. She said in a sleepy voice that it was so.
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Tanya, Severodonetsk

“ Half past six in the morning they wake me up with the words: "Get up, the war has begun!" A joke? No... ”
02/24/2022 will remain a sick date in my life forever. Half past six in the morning they wake me up with the words: “Get up, the war has begun!” A joke? No… I’m calling my godmother in Kharkov, I need to know that everything is fine with my loved ones. Scared, crying, complete misunderstanding of the situation.
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Nastya, Kiev / Germany

“ The explosions squeezed my chest, and I felt that at some point I would just fall. ”
I was born and raised in Kiev. I studied here, met wonderful people, and worked. I didn’t believe in war, but in a few days I felt that something could be. Before that, I often had depressive episodes, I didn’t know what to do, and just went with the flow. She worked as a marketer in the company, led their Instagram and promoted the visual novel account. But it wasn’t like that, I wanted to leave and start from scratch.
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Maria, Kiev

“ During the days of the war there were a lot of emotions: animal fear, fierce hatred, complete despair, burning hopelessness, complete apathy ... ”
I am a mother of 2 sons aged 19 and 7. When the war started, I woke up from a call from a friend. I had time to think what nonsense it was, when suddenly the windows trembled from the blast wave and the car alarms went off. A month has passed, I still don’t understand how this could happen, how it was allowed.We were in our apartment for two nights. It was very difficult psychologically, so we went to the country. She is also in Kiev, but we have boarded up the window, and the sounds of explosions are now heard remotely, it gives a sense of security.
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Irina, Berdyansk

“ I came to myself, my brain turned on. But life seemed to have twisted into a spring. You can't unclench it, you can't stretch it, it's static. ”
For me, the war began with her expectation. Everything has been shaky since December, but I realized that there would be a war on the night of February 22-23, when I watched a meeting of the Security Council of the Russian Federation, and then Putin’s speech. The confidence came that the decision was made, the bill goes for days.
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Tatiana, Shostka / Kiev / Novye Petrovtsy

“ We work constantly, and on February 24, as always, we planned to wake up at 6.40. My daughter goes to school, we go to work. But at 5.30 we woke up to the fact that the house was shaking, the windows were ringing. War. ”
Today is the 35th day. I don’t want to count anymore. The hope of returning to normal life is almost completely gone. I am 41 years old. I am from the Sumy region, the city of Shostka. Russian-speaking region. My father is Russian, from the Kursk region. Now the city of Shostka is surrounded and cut off.
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Marina, Kharkiv / Krivoy Rog

“ In the morning we woke up not from an alarm clock, but from terrible explosions. My daughter started crying. I needed to calm her down, so I didn't come up with anything other than "this is some kind of loud garbage truck". ”
It is still difficult for me to write and it is difficult for me to realize what is happening. On the 23rd, at work, we read the news about the introduction of martial law, about the signing of a decree by the president of a neighboring country, and we thought that this would bypass us – they would scare each other with pieces of paper, agree and disperse. Then there was an ordinary evening: dinner, daughter’s homework, a walk in the park. Everyday, everyday things. But I put the documents that were at home in one folder and left them on the table. Just in case. In the morning we woke up not from an alarm clock, but from terrible explosions. My daughter started crying. I needed to calm her down, so I didn’t come up with anything other than
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Olya, Dner / Germany

“ Before that, none of us was going to leave, since our city is far from the line of hostilities, although explosions thundered in our house on the first night. ”
Thank you very much for publishing the stories of Ukrainians. I realized that I want to write my own, too. I am from Dner, but now in Germany. We (me, my 10-year-old son, sister and her future daughter-in-law) left after the nuclear power plant in Energodar was shelled. Before that, none of us was going to leave, since our city is far from the line of hostilities, although explosions thundered in our house on the first night.
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Zhenya, Gostomel

“ I thought it was a phone glitch, because she never calls so early. I answer. The sister shouts: "Zhenya, he started the war, they are bombing Boryspil!". ”
The war caught me at the train station in Kiev. On February 24, at 05:52, I had a train to Lviv to speak at the conference the next day — I am the head of the lagotvoritelny fund. At 5:30, I was sitting in the new waiting room when I saw that my sister was calling me. I thought it was a phone glitch, because she never calls so early. I answer. The sister shouts: “Zhenya, he started the war, they are bombing Boryspil!”.
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Olya, Kyiv/Poland

“ My daughter started asking, "Are we going to die? Will the house be bombed?" I said no, but I was getting less and less sure. I decided to leave. ”
Not far from my house in Kyiv, a new shopping center was bombed. Our house was shaken, but the windows are intact.
On February 24, my husband and I woke up to a knock on the door to our a room. It was my dad, who barely moved around the apartment. He was woken up by a call from my husband’s dad from Kharkiv, informing him about the bombing. After about ten minutes, the explosions began in our house. So for the first time, I felt like everything inside was frozen, and I couldn’t breathe normally. My husband taped all the windows. I didn’t know what to do. Wake up my daughter or not. Packing up or not. There was a complete stupor. We decided to stay in Kyiv until the situation cleared up.
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